Findings

As of Spring 2017, transfer-aspiring students who met with a transfer advisor from a four-year college in Fall 2014 transferred at a rate about 10% higher than those who did not meet with a transfer advisor (42.1% vs. 32.5%). In addition, 2.4% more of these students graduated if they met with a transfer advisor from a four-year college in Fall 2014.

graph of students who met with college advisor vs. those who did not

As of Spring 2017, transfer-aspiring students who visited a four-year college campus in Fall 2014 transferred at a rate about 11% higher than students who did not visit (40.2% vs. 29.4%).
graph of students visited a four-year college campus vs. those who did not


Wang, X., Wickersham, K., Lee, S., Lor, N., Gaskew, A., & Prevost, A. The road to becoming a scientist: Supports and barriers perceived by transfer-aspiring community college students.


What salient factors are associated with beginning two-year college STEM students' intent to transfer to baccalaureate STEM programs?

This study combined surveys and interviews to explore factors associated with beginning two-year college STEM students’ decision to transfer into STEM bachelor’s degree programs, as well as how these factors acted as supports and barriers toward students’ choice to stay or leave the STEM transfer pathway. The survey results revealed 10 key factors that played a role, with interview findings demonstrating the ways in which the factors brought them closer to or drew them away from their educational path in STEM.


Wickersham, K., & Wang, X. (2016). What’s life got to do with it? The role of life experiences in shaping female community college students’ transfer intent in STEM fields of study. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 40(12), 1001-1012.

In what ways do life experiences shape the transfer intent of femail two-year college students in STEM fields of study?

This study explores the ways in which life experiences shape the transfer intent of female two-year college students in STEM fields of study. Through interviews and survey data concentrating on two women, the findings reveal the complexity around the pursuit of transfer and how life experiences can bring these students closer, or drive them away from, transfer in STEM.


Wang, X., Sun, N., Lee, S. Y., Wagner, B., & Chan, H. -Y. (2015, November). Exploring the relationship between active learning, transfer intent, and transfer self-efficacy among students beginning in STEM fields at two-year colleges. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Center for Education Research. (PDF)

In this study, we explore the potential linkage between active learning—pedagogical practices that engage students intellectually and encourage thinking, problem-solving, questioning, or analyzing information— and intent to transfer. Analyzing a combination of students’ survey and transcript data, the main findings are presented below:

Findings

 

.14
The more active learning students are involved in, the higher their transfer self-efficacy. A one-point increase in students’ active learning scale (a 5-point scale with 5 indicating the most amount of active learning) is associated with a .14 point increase in their transfer self-efficacy scale (a 5-point scale with 5 indicating the highest level of self-efficacy).


9.7%The higher self-efficacy students have about their ability to handle the transfer process, the stronger their intent to transfer into a non-STEM field at a four-year institution. An increase by one standard deviation above the mean in a student’s transfer self-efficacy scale (a 5-point scale with 5 indicating the strongest transfer self-efficacy) is associated with a 9.7% increase in the probability of the student having the intent to transfer into a non-STEM field at a four-year institution, as opposed to not intending to transfer.


5.4%The higher self-efficacy students have about their ability to handle the transfer process, the stronger their intent to transfer into a STEM field at a four-year institution. An increase by one standard deviation above the mean in a student’s transfer self-efficacy scale (a 5-point scale with 5 indicating the strongest transfer self-efficacy) is associated with a 5.4% increase in the probability of the student having the intent to transfer into a STEM field at a four-year institution, as opposed to not intending to transfer.


2.0%The more active learning students are involved in, the higher their intent to transfer into a STEM field in a four-year institution. An increase by one standard deviation above the mean in a student’s active learning scale (a 5-point scale with 5 indicating the most amount of active learning) is associated with a 2.0% increase in the probability of the student having the intent to transfer into a STEM field at a four-year institution, as opposed to not intending to transfer.